NTZ 1.0 unknown

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gaucho
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These tablets are being sold on Scottish streets as 1mg alprazolam. Experience tells me they are no such thing. Can anybody identify them? Country of origin unknown but certainly European of some sort. No recognisable BZD effect whatever.
Help anybody?

NTZ 1.0 

Cheers!
GAUCHO

acey
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hmmm interestin.

Good post old friend!

I am curious to find out what these are.  I would think Nitrazepam.  But the standard Nitraz is white.

It looks like valium.  The taste would tell the tale, alpraz has a distinct bitter taste. 

Maybe somebody will crack the case wide open for us.

Cheers

Acey

goat
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re:

I was thinking the same. I am unable to use my laptop that has a couple foreign databases bookmarked.

ohaithere
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It looks like diazepam 10 mg

It looks like diazepam 10 mg to me too, but I can't verify. If you image search "diazepam 10" you'll see many manufacturers make theirs look similar to this (size, colour, shape).

gaucho
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10mg? Imprint is clearly '1.0'...

These things have started to appear again.

I can not accept the diazepam theory for two reasons - firstly, the imprint is clearly ONE milligram (the point can not be a flaw, it is embossed as clearly as the numbers) & not 10mg.

Secondly, there is no sedative effect at all. People are buying the things not knowing what exactly they are and reporting that they are '&*&?'.

Somebody has suggested they might be some kind of blood thinning agent. Does anybody know of any drug which would be of that strength and look like this with that property?

***********************

Acey old friend,  your avatar shows the brand of diazepam which is most commonly encountered in this area right now. How do you find the tablets from the new Belgrade factory compared with those made in Krka, Slovenia? Personally I can not detect any difference at all, like the Romanian and Hungarian-made FRONTIN alprazolam by Egis. Both are as good as each other.

EDIT:

I would not have thought that particular word would require to be filtered! It is common and I just checked the dictionary, which doesn't have the usual (obsc.), (vulg.) or any other 'taboo' description which swear words carry (Chambers Dictionary 2012)...

 

goat
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i think i know the word

 and its filtered because you can add a few words before it and throw  a nasty insult.  website designUndecided

goat
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i see it

 listed as posibbly pyrazolam and nifoxipam somethimg pretty weak

gaucho
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NTZ 1.0 Blue pill, ingredients unknown

There have been more than 25 deaths in Scotland in the past year which have been positively linked to these tablets, but as yet there have been NO information releases by any forensic or health authorities.

There is a video uploaded to YouTube, which I forget NAME of but may be found by searching 'Scotland Valium Epidemic Problem' or something similar, lasting around 27-28 mins. Interesting but no further info. Only yesterday, there was another death in Inverclyde area linked to NTZs.

I can think of NOTHING of strength 1mg which would do such things so these pyrazolam (WTF is that? I am told it is the Roche-Sternbach compound CHLORODIAZEPAM which was synthesised and trialled in 1965 but never marketed, brought back in the early 70s but shelved since then in favour of fludiazepam (Brand Name: Erispan) which eventually was patented in Japan by Sumitomo Corp.when Roche decided that it was too close in properties to flunitrazepam. The similar molecule flutazolam (Coreminal) was later added as a slightly less potent but infinitely more sedating alternative - I find that 8mg Coreminal sedates to the extent of perhaps 50mg diazepam or 5-6mg flutazolam... Sources: personal experience, Patent retrieved from Wikipedia page, analysis of trial from same source.

Nifoxipam, as I understand it, is a nitro-substituted analogue of a fluorinated oxazepam molecule, which is approx. 5 x potency of oxazepam itself. A friend who has found it somewhere (God knows where, not a single one of my manufacturers of APIs or their wholesalers has even got it listed and I can not find a CAS Registry record for such a substance either...) tells me that it doesn't seem to have any effects which merit it being used clinically, and is almost useless as a recreational drug also. Seresta and Seresta Forte 30 and 50mg (Serepax in some countries), Praxiten - Meda's version, the others being the ex-Wyeth, now Pfizer, or Aspen Pharmacare if you happen to be in South Africa, & its Forte certainly DO have a place in both spheres!

W. GOAT -- I hardly think that 'weak' could be a suitable word considering the number of deaths attributed to these pills. However, I think we can rule out any benzodiazepines or thienodiazepines. I acquired two of these things the other day and when I am able to afford the GBP £40 for the test which will attempt ID by comparison with all known compounds but which is able only to give a figure stating ratio of the major API with any others found,  not any actual indication of how much is present weightwise AND the £150 for the further test which will identify EVERYTHING in the pill, complete with precise weights of each component,  APIs and excipients (inert) alike, for which I will require to send a complete tablet (test #1 requires only the exact amount of 20mg of the pill for the simple result), I will do so. 

I performed tests (2) using Marquis and Mecke reagents yesterday using the commercial 'EZ' tests - which I urge members to buy, I find the two Opiate tests and the BZD one most useful, followed by the stimulamt test - I have found so much caffeine in supposed 'downs', particularly illicitly made opioids,  it's untrue. NTZ 1.0 gibes NO REACTION with Marquis and a pale yellow colour with Mecke, but of you know that reagent, that could indicate almost anything. It does, however, suggest that ghere is a pharmacologically active ingredient in them. Of some kind. Maybe the commercial Lab will find out more, and be useful enough for me to alert the Press, and thus the complete (trying to think of a word which will not get filtered) pea-brains, cretins, morons,  idiots, psychos and ignoramuses with which this benighted country appears to be filled. Providing they are able to read. Or that they read anything other than the back Sports pages. 

Does anyone agree that would be money well spent, or should I find somebody at one of the Universities to do it and spend the cash on substances which I NEED to remain well and sane?

 

gaucho
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SEVERAL MESSAGES RECEIVED WITH ID

These pills have been identified as ETIZOLAM, illicitly pressed and containing up to ten times the embossed 1mg dosage.

One correspondent had them tested at a Dutch site (primarily for MDMA tablets/powder) which positively identified the active ingredient and the 10 x dosage per tablet.

The deaths referred to, I discovered, were as a result of using these in conjunction with opiates, mainly her0in but a couple involving fentanyl HCl, rapidly becoming more commonly seen in Scotland, in powder form, selling at between £120 & 600 per gram, depending on source, purity (there has been a lot of poorly synthesised, therefore incomplete and containing butyr-, acetyl- and isofluoro- analogs with HCl content of only 65-70%. Etizolam is deceptively strong and junkies have been taking these in ridiculously high quantity along with their m0rphine, oxyc0done, fentanyl but especially her0in, to 'boost' potency of the poor, adulterated Afghan product prevalent in the UK.

Conclusion: polydrug usage involving huge etizolam dosage combined with opioids.